DOES MY BABY HEAR?

Hearing Tests for Babies

Hearing, like most, phenomenon in a modern world, can be accurately measured. Hearing tests for babies or evaluations are designed to accurately measure hearing in your baby. Your observations of your baby’s responses to sound and to the voices of those he or she loves will provide insight on whether or not your baby needs an evaluation.Your observation provides valuable information but it cannot replace hearing tests for babies.

Homemade tests such as clapping and ringing puja bells do not provide accurate information as your baby may see or feel their vibrations rather than hear them. Further the loudness of these sounds has not been measured nor has the distance from which they are made. These changing variables do not provide the consistency needed to accurately measure hearing.

Infant development follows a pattern which has been formally documented as Developmental Milestones or Speech and Hearing Milestones. These developmental milestones describe expected growth in many areas, particularly in the development of auditory skills in babies. These Speech and Hearing Milestones serve as a guide to chart your baby’s progress and have been listed below. Enter your baby’s age to gain a better understanding of how babies of the same age typically react when they hear sound and also when they are spoken to.

Identifying Hearing Loss in Children from Birth to 2 Months

FROM BIRTH TO 2 MONTHS

Does your baby startle to loud and/or abrupt noises?

Does your baby react to the sound of your voice?

Identifying Hearing Loss in Children from 3 Months to 6 Months

FROM 3 MONTHS TO 6 MONTHS

Is your baby soothed by your voice?

Does your baby try to turn his or her head towards an interesting sound?

Does your baby make non speech sounds (e.g. blow “raspberries”, squeal, growl, yell) and engage in vocal play?

Does your baby cry in different ways to express different needs such as if he or she is hungry or needs a nappy change?

Identifying Hearing Loss in Children from 7 Months to 10 Months

FROM 7 MONTHS TO 10 MONTHS

Does your baby like to play with noise making toys?

Does your baby react to environmental sounds: dog barking, telephone ringing, own name?

Does your baby still babble, including babble different consonant sounds (m, n, p, b, g, t, k, d) mixed with vowel sounds (mamama, papapa, etc)?

Does your baby react to changes in the tone of your voice?

Stops when “No-No” or name is said

Identifying Hearing Loss in Children from 11 Months to 15 Months

FROM 11 MONTHS TO 15 MONTHS

Does your baby respond to music or singing?

Does your baby look at familiar objects or people when asked (e.g. “Where’s the ball?” “ Where’s daddy?”)?

Does your baby use his or her voice for getting your attention and use single words with meaning (e.g. mama, papa)?

Identifying Hearing Loss in Children from 16 Months to 18 Months

FROM 16 MONTHS TO 18 MONTHS

Does your baby correctly match sound to object (eg. Look towards the door on hearing the ding dong of the doorbell,look at the dog on hearing a barking dog)?

Does your baby point to a few body parts when named?

Does your baby understand about 50 words?

Does your baby speak about 10 – 20 words (may not be complete or be perfectly pronounced) typically in one word sentences?

Identifying Hearing Loss in Children from 19 Months to 24 Months

FROM 19 MONTHS TO 24 MONTHS

Does your baby follow simple directions without being shown what to do (E.g. “Pick up the ball and give it to Papa.”)?

Does your baby’s voice sound normal and does he or she use a variety of everyday words heard at home?

Does your baby make simple sentences which may not be grammatically correct?

Does your baby understand YES and NO questions?

Identifying Hearing Loss in Children from 25 Months to 30 Months

FROM 25 MONTHS TO 30 MONTHS

Does your child say or sign short rhymes or songs?

Does your child use about 270 words?

Does your child name objects and describe them by using words like big, more, nice, fast, etc.?

Does your child turn to sounds from the side, below and above her?

Identifying Hearing Loss in Children from 31 Months to 36 Months

FROM 31 MONTHS TO 36 MONTHS

Does your child understand and use simple verbs (e.g. go, drink), pronouns (e.g.me, you), prepositions (e.g.in, on) and adjectives (e.g. big, many, small)?

Does your child understand up to 3,600 words?

Does your child use up to 900 – 1000 words, with an average of 3 to 4 words per sentence?

Is your child able to tell a story and sing songs?

Does your child know her name and the names of family members?

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